Beginning Aikido: Adult Introductory Workshop – Jan 10, 2015

Date: Saturday, January 10, 2015 ~ 2:00pm - 5:00pm Beginning Aikido is a FREE workshop offered on Saturday, January 10, 2015 from 2:00pm – 5:00 pm. This FREE workshop will be taught jointly by senior students of Aikido Shugyo Dojo. It is for new members (in their first six months) at Aikido Shugyo Dojo, and others who have no experience in Aikido, but are interested in trying. This workshop offers a comfortable atmosphere in which to try new things and to ask questions. Please bring a t-shirt and loose-fitting pants. For more information, please contact Fran Turner. Elements in the workshop, Beginning Aikido, include: Ukemi—fear of falling, balance, power Timing—dynamic vs. static practice, waiting Contact—controls, locks, pins, contact exercises Centred Movement—weapons demonstration, selected techniques Breathing—ki and relaxation Demonstrations of weapons practice, dealing with multiple attackers and technique reversals ...
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Shugyo Dojo 30th Anniversary: Special Classes and Celebration

In October 1984, Fran Sensei started teaching morning classes at the downtown Y. This was the start for what has become Aikido Shugyo Dojo. Please join us for a weekend seminar and the party to celebrate our 30 years. The 30th Anniversary Seminar will take place at our dojo on Saturday & Sunday, November 29 & 30. Please note that for this seminar, kids are invited to the first class on Saturday, after which there will be photos taken. The regular Saturday kids class at noon is cancelled. Saturday, Nov 29 10 to 11 - Fran Turner Sensei 11 to noon - Gabe DiMarco Sensei Lunch break 2 to 3 - Stefan Barton Sensei, Golden Triangle Aikikai 3 to 4 - Fran Turner Sensei Sunday, Nov 30 10 to 11 - Gabe DiMarco Sensei 11 to noon - Fran Turner Sensei The party takes place on Saturday evening, November 29. Details to follow. ...
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Mary Heiny Sensei – 2014 Seminar

A seminar with Mary Heiny Sensei, 6th dan Dates: Saturday and Sunday, November 1 & 2 Aikido Shugyo Dojo invites you to join us for a weekend seminar with Mary Heiny Sensei. We have been privileged to host her seminars at our dojo for over twenty years. Each visit is a special treat. Mary Sensei's understanding seems to deepen in the intervening year and every seminar with us she brings more to share with participants on the mat. Mary Sensei’s Aikido instruction is inspiring, and her teaching works profoundly on body and mind. Times: Sat: 10:00 am – 12:00 noon and 2:30 pm – 4:30 pm Sun: 10:00 am – noon Prices: Half Day – $40 Saturday only – $80 Full seminar – $100 For more than forty years, Mary Heiny Sensei has followed a path of physical and spiritual inspiration as a student and teacher of Aikido. She started this journey in 1965 after watching O'Sensei teach a class at Hombu Dojo in Tokyo, Japan. The effect of this...
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Relaxation in Aikido

by Tom Buis (Shodan) In aikido, we practice attacking one another and defending ourselves, and either of these roles may feel unfamiliar or even a little unsettling at times, particularly when it all happens quickly and unexpectedly. Imagine sitting down at the breakfast table when your little brother yanks your chair from under you, and you feel yourself falling backwards toward the floor, eyes bulging. Or imagine you are looking at your phone as you step off a bottom step, except that there is one more step and you feel yourself falling forward. This is what aikido can feel like. As Uke (attacker), you see your target and deliver some strike or grab, but just at the very last second, what was just there now no longer is, and as you are realizing this, you are upside down in the air. As Nage (defender), you may be looking at a hand or the edge of a hard wooden weapon coming down toward...
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Peripheral Awareness

by Nick Stam (2nd kyu) This month's theme for practice at the dojo was “peripheral awareness”, a skill useful in Aikido in scenarios like multi-uke randori or jiyuwaza, as well as general safe practice on a busy mat with bodies flying everywhere. Indeed I think there is a lot of opportunity to develop this skill within the dojo, from sitting in seiza with a soft gaze to finding a safe place to stand when you are the odd one out in partner practice, and of course any time you are actively practicing by being aware of the other practitioners and the space. A beginner like me might get very focused on the technique, or even part of a technique, and because of this everything falls apart. Maybe I get too focused on the grip I am trying to find, but I forget to move my feet, or keep my posture, or breathe, or any number of important points. I think this is normal...
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Hanmi

by Len McKee (3rd kyu) This month I learned, discovered or was reminded that hanmi is a state of equilibrium for both the mind and the body. In hanmi, the body is balanced over the feet, firmly rooted to the ground, not so close as to trip over each other yet not so far apart that you can be knocked over easily. The feet are in a position that will allow you to blend with whatever uke may do - moving forward, backwards, diagonally or from side to side, however slight or large the movement. The mind is focused, equally aware of all that surrounds you, You feel and project calm, relaxation and stability, neutralizing aggression in your own mind and the mind of your partner. This creates a positive, not confrontational, feeling. Paying attention to hanmi also minimizes opening up to an attack.  All techniques, begin and end with hanmi....
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Posture

by David Wilson (1st Kyu) Good Posture: Alignment is Everything Head over chest over hips: the posture mantra.  When you have good posture and maintain it throughout a technique, you stand a far better chance of keeping proper maai (the distance between you and your attacker), of moving from your center, of unbalancing your attacker and of using chi and physics rather than force.  But good posture can be elusive.  Many of us think we have good posture when, in fact, we are leaning forward (or back), leading with our chins or looking down at our hands. Here are a few simple ways to develop good posture: 1.  Stand parallel to a mirror in hanmi.  Turn your head and look at yourself.  If necessary, correct your posture and pay attention to how proper posture feels different than the way you were standing at first.  It might feel quite unnatural if you are used to leaning forward or back. 2.  Sit in seiza parallel to a mirror. ...
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Practice Theme – January 2014 – Hanmi

When practicing Aikido, both uke and nage need to pay attention to their foot positions. The distance between the feet is about the width of your shoulders. Hanmi is a triangular stance created when the ball of your front foot is aligned with the ball of your rear foot. The right foot in front is right hanmi or migi hanmi, and left hanmi (left foot in front) is hidari hanmi. There is more to hanmi than foot position. Weight distribution in hanmi is typically 60 per cent of the body weight over the front foot and 40 per cent over the back foot. But this is a guideline, since hanmi is a compromise between stability and dynamic movement, and your weight shifts as you move. Your front knee should be just over the toes of the front foot, and both knees are relaxed. Drop your hips. When starting and finishing a waza, nage’s feet should be in hanmi. Especially in a situation where...
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Beginning Aikido: Adult Introductory Workshop – Jan 11, 2014

Date: Saturday, January 11, 2014 -2:00pm - 5:00pm Beginning Aikido is a FREE workshop offered on Saturday, January 11, 2014 from 2:00 – 5:00 pm. This FREE workshop will be taught jointly by senior students of Aikido Shugyo Dojo. It is for new members (in their first six months) at Aikido Shugyo Dojo, and others who have no experience in Aikido, but are interested in trying. This workshop offers a comfortable atmosphere in which to try new things and to ask questions. Please bring a t-shirt and loose-fitting pants. For more information, please contact Fran Turner. Elements in the workshop, Beginning Aikido, include: Ukemi—fear of falling, balance, power Timing—dynamic vs. static practice, waiting Contact—controls, locks, pins, contact exercises Centred Movement—weapons demonstration, selected techniques Breathing—ki and relaxation Demonstrations of weapons practice, dealing with multiple attackers and technique reversals ...
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